Critics Not Critical Caretakers

Picture 4Interested in an interview with Russell McCutcheon,
on the topic of critics and caretakers?

 

On Overlooking the Gap

Picture 7Culture on the Edge‘s Curator, Andie Alexander, has caught the blogging bug and posted on the blog for grads of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Alabama — on the possibility of time traveling if you just pronounce Shakespeare right.

Give it a read.

 

Accidental Favorites

Steven Ramey was the 2012-13 President of the Southeast Region of the American Academy of Religion (AAR). Here he gives the Presidential Plenary Address for its annual (held in South Carolina in March of 2013) entitled, “Accidental Favorites: The Implicit in the Study of Religions.” Although not referencing Culture on the Edge explicitly, the themes Ramey discusses are directly related to many of the group’s–as Jonathan Z. Smith named them in his own career–persistent preoccupations.

Presidential Plenary Address for the 2013 Southeastern AAR from UA Religious Studies on Vimeo.

(Thanks to Andie Alexander, a graduate of the University of Alabama’s Department of Religious Studies, for filming Steven.)

New books on historicity of identity

equinoxlogoWe have contracted the initial two volumes in the Culture on the Edge Book Series with Equinox Publishers, both resulting form the research group’s own work.

Claiming Identity in the Study of Religion (edited by Monica Miller) provides a collection of previously published essays by scholar of religion, Russell T. McCutcheon, that highlights different identifying claims within the work of a number of leading scholars of religion. New, substantive introductions to each essay, authored by other scholars interested in the historicity of identity, highlight the strategies of identification employed by the scholars whom McCutcheon analyzes.

The Problem of Nostalgia in the Study of Identity (edited by Vaia Touna) tackles the problem of how to examine the historicity of identity through four discrete case studies, with an Introduction by Craig Martin.